Oak Furniture Kits

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    How do i remove old ink stains from antique oak?
    Hello! i'm not really sure how this thing works (i've not been on the internet long)...bare with me! i have recently been given and a victorian solid oak desk,that i intend to restore.The top has a few old ink spills/stains.although i usually like the 'character' of old furniture,these marks are quite offensive to the eye..i want rid! does anyone know how to remove such stains? or...has anyone used wood bleaches? would these work? cheers,andy

    • ANSWER:
      Had a repair shop & worked for several antique dealers.
      Have used wood bleaches & well , they bleach wood which is what will happen if you go after the ink with it & barely touch the ink esp if the stains are the same vintage as the piece.
      If it is blue ink , it is "modern" & might respond to bleach.
      Would try an oxygen bleach rather than a chlorine wood bleach which will really whiten the wood.
      Oak will darken over time & bleach will take it beyond it's natural color
      Taking the longer view.......if you try to bleach it out & fail , you are in for a complete refinish.
      Anything that starts to dissolve the ink will just make it creep deeper into the wood.
      Cannot see the piece & sitting here scratching my head so as not to give bad tips.
      OK....Nice old victorian desk
      Safest, give it a good cleaning , pastewax, & live w/ the "charm"
      A little work , but a place to start & what I would do for the shops on a nice old piece.
      Next safest, a restorer kit like Formbys that reduces the existing finish but may also help by getting to any ink that is in the finish.
      All out, hand stripping & refinishing.
      Makes me cringe , but light sanding may be necessary & you should do the entire top.
      Bleach & stain...avoid if possible .
      Sounds like a nice desk ...be gentle.
      Best regards

  2. QUESTION:
    Kitchen cabinets in good shape outside. Where can I get new drawer glides, shelving accessories...?
    I'd like to make better use of the space inside the cabinets and fix the drawers that drop when opened, don't glide out smoothly or don't close. Cabinets are original-35+ yrs. old, oak, look great on outside.

    • ANSWER:
      Kitchen counters are 25 inches deep so consequently cabinets should be 24 inches deep. (and about 30 inches high) Drawer glides are available in kits from Home Depot or Lowes or any other hardware store that deals in furniture or cabinets. Glue any drawer joints that seem loose. Drawer glides are easily attached with small screws. There is a left and right side and they are marked. Shelving kits for wall or base cabinets are usually just clips that go into the holes in the side, and again available from any reputable hardware store.

  3. QUESTION:
    How to build a simple "L" shaped computer desk?
    I would like to build an "L" shaped computer desk for my living room, which is quite large. I have two complete computer systems to set up on it. I am not sure where to go to find simple plans using like 3/8 plywood, some 2x4's maybe, cutting edges for 45 degree angle, and fastening it all together. I will figure out the dimensions later. All I know is I want the lengths of each side to extend maybe 6 to 7 feet from the corner. Nothing fancy required. Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      I have an L shaped desk, the extended part that makes the L is connected by a very strong metal piece which is screwed on and can be removed when moving furniture around. The extended piece opens by sliding up the cupboard and it has two shelves. The desk itself has the normal desk drawers.

      You can either get the wood from ACE hardware stores and all the other hinges and whatever to build it.

      Sometimes the wood alone is more expensive than buying an actual desk.

      Here a great idea anyway.

      Here is a simple do-it-yourself solution. Buy 2, 2-drawer metal filing cabinets and a flat solid door or thick piece of plywood to lay across them. You could make plywood look decent by getting a piece with an oak veneer or something and a piece of oak trim along the front edge. The easiest would be a nice sturdy door that's already finished. Shop around for a decent keyboard tray to screw on underneath. Get a nice fully adjustable chair. Buy a cable management kit to organise you wires. Depending on your printer you might be able to get some kind of stand to stack your printer and scanner on top of each other or a smaller table to form the L shape, you can find many at Ikea in the kitchen area- they have all kinds.

  4. QUESTION:
    How do i get rid of woodworm?

    • ANSWER:
      Believe it or not there is a site dedicated to woodworm. It's www.diydoctor.org.uk, ad another site that sells treatments is www.woodworm-info.co.uk
      Here's some of the stuff from the diydoctor site. ( I must get out a bit more!!)

      WOODWORM 1 (The furniture beetle)
      There are 3 types of woodworm in this country. The common Furniture Beetle, dealt with first, the House Longhorn Beetle and Deathwatch Beetle.

      Damage by the furniture beetle is identifiable by a peppering of tiny holes in the surface of the wood. These holes are in fact emergence holes meaning that the adult beetle has emerged from and left the timber after spending its time tunnelling through it as a grub.

      The most common woodworm is the furniture beetle. This beetle attacks softwoods leaving 1-2mm exit holes in most softwoods. It prefers damp rather than dry wood and the grubs will head for, and stay in, plywood for longer than any other timber. Damp floorboards, damp loft timbers and old furniture a where the polished finish has worn off, (the furniture beetle prefers unfinished wood like old floorboards and loft rafters) are good targets for the beetle. The beetle lays its eggs on the timber and the grubs do the burrowing and tunnel about in the timber. With active woodworm there is a scattering of tiny dust piles on the timber. These are called frass. Structural weakening is rare with the furniture beetle except in timbers whose cross section is small and there is a lot of damp. In older houses for example, where the floor joists are near the ground and ventilation may have been blocked. Treatment for this beetle can be bought from most Diy stores in the form of a spray or liquid preservative. Building Societies will insist on a specialist company if structural timber has been affected. For detailed advice and a comprehensive treatment kit, click here.

      WOODWORM 2 (The House Longhorn Beetle)
      The house Longhorn Beetle is not common in the UK except in certain areas of North Surrey. It is principally found in roof timbers where it attacks the sapwood of exclusively softwood timbers often resulting in structural weakness. The holes and tunnels of this beetle are significantly larger than the furniture beetle. Treatment for this beetle can be bought from most Diy stores in the form of a spray or liquid preservative. Building Societies will insist on a specialist company if structural timber has been affected. Buildings in this area, to comply with building regulations, must have all new timbers treated. For detailed advice and a comprehensive treatment kit, click here.

      WOODWORM 3 (The Deathwatch beetle)
      Deathwatch Beetle is common throughout the South of England. Northern parts are not affected except where timbers have been imported. This beetle attacks large hardwood timbers such as Elm and Oak. The beetle, having started in hardwoods like these may move across to neighbouring softwoods in a kind of feeding frenzy! This beetle much prefers very damp conditions and even better when there is some kind of fungal decay or "wet rot" in the timbers. The beetle needs these conditions to develop rapidly. Treatment, as with the other two, can be done in the form of a paste, spray on application or a paint on preservative. It is suggested strongly that if you think you have Deathwatch Beetle, call in a specialist. For detailed advice and a comprehensive treatment kit, click here.

      Sizes of adult beetle
      Furniture beetle
      Anobium punctatum
      (About 3 mm long)

      Death-watch beetle
      Xestobium rufovillosum
      (About 6 mm long)

      Powder-post beetle
      Lyctus brunneus
      (About 3-6 mm long)

      For repairs to joists and rafters without removing sections of the ceiling click here.

      For info regarding dry rot treatment and repairs click here

      Specific information regarding repairing splits and shakes can be found here

      Specific information regarding roof truss repairs can be found here.

      And don't forget the free helpline.

      WOODWORM 1 (The furniture beetle)
      There are 3 types of woodworm in this country. The common Furniture Beetle, dealt with first, the House Longhorn Beetle and Deathwatch Beetle.

      Damage by the furniture beetle is identifiable by a peppering of tiny holes in the surface of the wood. These holes are in fact emergence holes meaning that the adult beetle has emerged from and left the timber after spending its time tunnelling through it as a grub.

      The most common woodworm is the furniture beetle. This beetle attacks softwoods leaving 1-2mm exit holes in most softwoods. It prefers damp rather than dry wood and the grubs will head for, and stay in, plywood for longer than any other timber. Damp floorboards, damp loft timbers and old furniture a where the polished finish has worn off, (the furniture beetle prefers unfinished wood like old floorboards and loft rafters) are good targets for the beetle. The beetle lays its eggs on the timber and the grubs do the burrowing and tunnel about in the timber. With active woodworm there is a scattering of tiny dust piles on the timber. These are called frass. Structural weakening is rare with the furniture beetle except in timbers whose cross section is small and there is a lot of damp. In older houses for example, where the floor joists are near the ground and ventilation may have been blocked. Treatment for this beetle can be bought from most Diy stores in the form of a spray or liquid preservative. Building Societies will insist on a specialist company if structural timber has been affected. For detailed advice and a comprehensive treatment kit, click here.

      WOODWORM 2 (The House Longhorn Beetle)
      The house Longhorn Beetle is not common in the UK except in certain areas of North Surrey. It is principally found in roof timbers where it attacks the sapwood of exclusively softwood timbers often resulting in structural weakness. The holes and tunnels of this beetle are significantly larger than the furniture beetle. Treatment for this beetle can be bought from most Diy stores in the form of a spray or liquid preservative. Building Societies will insist on a specialist company if structural timber has been affected. Buildings in this area, to comply with building regulations, must have all new timbers treated. For detailed advice and a comprehensive treatment kit, click here.

      WOODWORM 3 (The Deathwatch beetle)
      Deathwatch Beetle is common throughout the South of England. Northern parts are not affected except where timbers have been imported. This beetle attacks large hardwood timbers such as Elm and Oak. The beetle, having started in hardwoods like these may move across to neighbouring softwoods in a kind of feeding frenzy! This beetle much prefers very damp conditions and even better when there is some kind of fungal decay or "wet rot" in the timbers. The beetle needs these conditions to develop rapidly. Treatment, as with the other two, can be done in the form of a paste, spray on application or a paint on preservative. It is suggested strongly that if you think you have Deathwatch Beetle, call in a specialist. For detailed advice and a comprehensive treatment kit, click here.

      Sizes of adult beetle
      Furniture beetle
      Anobium punctatum
      (About 3 mm long)

      Death-watch beetle
      Xestobium rufovillosum
      (About 6 mm long)

      Powder-post beetle
      Lyctus brunneus
      (About 3-6 mm long)

      FASCINATING STUFF EH!!!

  5. QUESTION:
    What can I use to get some stains out of my oak table? The stains consist of egg dye from Easter egg kits.?

    • ANSWER:
      I copied this from the link below: Mix dishwashing detergent in hot water and swish to make a great volume of suds. Dip a cloth in only the foam and apply. Rinse with a clean cloth moistened with clear water. Polish or wax as soon as possible. (It's the last thing on the page of the link.)

      I myself have had wine stains on antique furniture, the soap does take it out, but you may need more than one attempt.
      After you do this, the detergent will dry out the wood. I have found that lemon oil is the best moisture replacement. Apply lemon oil evenly with a dry washcloth and lightly rub in. You will probably need more than one application of lemon oil also, wait a day inbetween applications of lemon oil to see how much has been absorbed.
      One thing you didn't tell us was what kind of finish your table has, but I'd still try the above methods no matter what it is.

  6. QUESTION:
    Painting a nursery - colour suggestions?
    We have a small (3m by 4m) nursery that is east facing and is to be painted for our first child. We don;t know the gender so want something fairly neutral. Key thing is that the furniture is dark english oak. The carpet is a cream colour (but can be changed) and there is mirrored wardrobe doors in the room opposite the window.

    Can anyone suggest a few colours that we should consider?

    Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      Paint it a light yellow, and a light green (mint) color. Those colors can work for either gender. Then, paint the bottom 3/4 of the room yellow, then the top part (and ceiling), green. The I would take a small brush, and make green "buttons" on the yellow part, and vice verse. This will draw your eyes upward. A nice white fan would match, and kept the carpet. Get a cream/barge roman shade. Maybe you could think about etching the mirror. Could you etch a border around it? That might make it less of an eyesore (go to a craft store, and buy a kit. It should come with everything (if you have questions;ask the workers))

  7. QUESTION:
    Furniture help!?
    My puppy shewed into the legs of my table chairs! how can I easily fix them? the table is a russian oak color and teh finish is natural.

    • ANSWER:
      You can get scratch repair kits in hardware stores, remodeling stores, home centers, and places like Wal Mart.

oak furniture kits

Solid Oak Furniture Kits

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    How do i remove old ink stains from antique oak?
    Hello! i'm not really sure how this thing works (i've not been on the internet long)...bare with me! i have recently been given and a victorian solid oak desk,that i intend to restore.The top has a few old ink spills/stains.although i usually like the 'character' of old furniture,these marks are quite offensive to the eye..i want rid! does anyone know how to remove such stains? or...has anyone used wood bleaches? would these work? cheers,andy

    • ANSWER:
      Had a repair shop & worked for several antique dealers.
      Have used wood bleaches & well , they bleach wood which is what will happen if you go after the ink with it & barely touch the ink esp if the stains are the same vintage as the piece.
      If it is blue ink , it is "modern" & might respond to bleach.
      Would try an oxygen bleach rather than a chlorine wood bleach which will really whiten the wood.
      Oak will darken over time & bleach will take it beyond it's natural color
      Taking the longer view.......if you try to bleach it out & fail , you are in for a complete refinish.
      Anything that starts to dissolve the ink will just make it creep deeper into the wood.
      Cannot see the piece & sitting here scratching my head so as not to give bad tips.
      OK....Nice old victorian desk
      Safest, give it a good cleaning , pastewax, & live w/ the "charm"
      A little work , but a place to start & what I would do for the shops on a nice old piece.
      Next safest, a restorer kit like Formbys that reduces the existing finish but may also help by getting to any ink that is in the finish.
      All out, hand stripping & refinishing.
      Makes me cringe , but light sanding may be necessary & you should do the entire top.
      Bleach & stain...avoid if possible .
      Sounds like a nice desk ...be gentle.
      Best regards

  2. QUESTION:
    How to build a simple "L" shaped computer desk?
    I would like to build an "L" shaped computer desk for my living room, which is quite large. I have two complete computer systems to set up on it. I am not sure where to go to find simple plans using like 3/8 plywood, some 2x4's maybe, cutting edges for 45 degree angle, and fastening it all together. I will figure out the dimensions later. All I know is I want the lengths of each side to extend maybe 6 to 7 feet from the corner. Nothing fancy required. Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      I have an L shaped desk, the extended part that makes the L is connected by a very strong metal piece which is screwed on and can be removed when moving furniture around. The extended piece opens by sliding up the cupboard and it has two shelves. The desk itself has the normal desk drawers.

      You can either get the wood from ACE hardware stores and all the other hinges and whatever to build it.

      Sometimes the wood alone is more expensive than buying an actual desk.

      Here a great idea anyway.

      Here is a simple do-it-yourself solution. Buy 2, 2-drawer metal filing cabinets and a flat solid door or thick piece of plywood to lay across them. You could make plywood look decent by getting a piece with an oak veneer or something and a piece of oak trim along the front edge. The easiest would be a nice sturdy door that's already finished. Shop around for a decent keyboard tray to screw on underneath. Get a nice fully adjustable chair. Buy a cable management kit to organise you wires. Depending on your printer you might be able to get some kind of stand to stack your printer and scanner on top of each other or a smaller table to form the L shape, you can find many at Ikea in the kitchen area- they have all kinds.

  3. QUESTION:
    are pine wood bunk beds a bad idea for kids?
    my mom and I are thinking of going in halves on a set of pine wood bunkbeds with underbed drawers. Here is a pic of item. http://cgi.ebay.com/TWIN-TWIN-PINE-BUNK-BED-2-DRAWERS_W0QQitemZ200180723547QQihZ010QQcategoryZ38188QQssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItemCost with shipping/tax/shipping insurance would be 2. When we were out shopping around locally to avoid shipping, one furniture place said he would price match if I brought in online info, but when I mentioned one online was pine he laughed and said pine was junk he only sold oak. His was 3( even with free delivery).. I know oak is better, but the cost of pine ones are already a huge stretch of our budget to get my grandkids these beds....is pine going to not be safe? The salesman made it sound like pine would just fall apart. So I didn't know if it was his way to try and sell his, or if pine was really shabby product.

    • ANSWER:
      There is nothing WRONG with pine wood. It built a whole country from 1700 to now.

      Properly designed, pine is a PERFECT wood for a kids room. True, it is a softwood, and it has a sometimes wild grain, but it is not going to be on display in the front living room.

      Just make sure the particular product is well designed, and make sure it is SOLID wood, not a laminate, compressed board, partical board, future board, or anything else BUT SOLID wood.

      . (I would be a bit concerned about "knockdown" furniture from China, the kind that comes as a kit and you have to put it together. This usually means partical board with applicae tape for grain imaging. Pure unaldulterated junk.

solid oak furniture kits

Oak Furniture Kitchen Table

If you are shopping around for a sleep number bed, you need to be sure that you compare prices and that you get the best sleep number mattress. Although, the sleep number mattress won't be found in all of the mattress stores that you find, they are still very popular and you should be able to find some of them locally. In addition, usually you find a sleep number bed on the Internet and they will ship them directly to you.

The fact is that there are numerous mattress companies that will offer you tremendous discounts on the sleep number bed that you want. These companies offer their customers with the discount rates around the holidays or all of the time. If there is a major holiday coming up, you should try to determine what deals you can find on the numerous sleep number mattresses that are available.

Another time that you may find discount prices on a sleep number bed is during end of the year sales. The way to get your sleep number bed at the lowest price possible, you should deliver the mattress to yourself. You will have no problem, depending on the size of the mattress, if you own, or can borrow, a large van or truck. In addition, most sleep number beds break down into boxes, therefore so you may need one additional person to help you carry the mattress into your house.

If you don't deliver the mattress set yourself, you will have to take the shipping cost into consideration when you are shopping for the lowest prices if you have to have the sleep number bed shipped or delivered to your house. While a mattress company might have the least expensive costs for your sleep number bed, they might have the most expensive shipping costs making the bed no longer affordable. If you consider all of these factors, you will probably find the sleep number bed for the lowest possible cost.

Although it may take some effort and work to really shop around for your sleep number bed but because these beds are usually very expensive, the effort and work it takes is worth the amount of money that you will save. In addition, every time you shop for a new mattress and bed, regardless if it is for a friend, a family member, or yourself, you will be in the know about which bedding store is the best with regard to selection and price.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    How much to ask for oak furniture?
    I have an oak kitchen table with 4 chairs, an oak hutch, oak sofa table, oak coffee table and 2 oak end tables. They are older but in amazing condition. How much should I ask to sell them as a set? Or how much would each of them go individually? Thanks for any help!

    • ANSWER:
      try to find the same or equivalent on ebay and price accordingly or ask yourself how much you would pay for the furniture

  2. QUESTION:
    Ideas for Living room curtain colors?
    Our walls are a light olive green color. We have oak hardwood flooring and darker furniture (kitchen table, Server, Recliners...) The curtains have to go over a double sliding patio door that leads to the deck. The patio faces the sun in the morning.
    Need some ideas as to what color curtain we should think of getting. We wold like to install a double rod so we can have a set of shear curtains between the inside curtain and patio door.
    Your help and suggestions would be much appreciated.

    • ANSWER:
      I would try to blend the curtains with the walls. Windows shouldn't necessarily "pop" but blend into the walls for a calm, serene look. If you can't match them perfectly choose a darker or lighter green that blends well.

  3. QUESTION:
    How do I remove a stain from an oak table?
    Solid oak kitchen table has a white stain where someone placed something hot. I am not able to get this stain removed and really do not want to have to strip the entire table top. The wood does not look burned rather it looks like the finish may be. Is it possible the furniture polish I used is the culprit here? Any help would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks in advance!
    Mike

    • ANSWER:
      The finish has been cooked but,not burned.I would use a grey Scotch-Brite pad and a little bit of mineral spirits to use as a lubricant and "wet sand" the spot.You will be sanding the finish and not the wood.The spot should fade considerably or maybe even disappear.If it doesn't go away with that it will need shot with a dab of lacquer.Lacquer finishes are wonderfully easy to fix.The new lacquer will actually dissolve any previous layers to adhere with an invisible fix.The only real thing to note is that some finishes are sprayed with a tinted coat to further enhance the color.Good luck.

  4. QUESTION:
    What do you call a pc of indoor oak furniture that doesn't have a hi-gloss finish?
    My mom has a solid oak kitchen table that does not have a high gloss finish, and is not prone to scratching as would a high gloss finish. She maintains it with linseed oil a few times a year. I can't seem to find out where to buy one (her store went out of business) and the furniture stores don't know what I am talking about.

    • ANSWER:
      It probably has a rubbed oil finish. That's the best thing for wood that gets daily use and hard wear. You never need to wax it, just rub it with tung oil or linseed oil every now and then. Many old homes have hardwood floors with rubbed oil finishes and they still look good after 50 years of wear.

  5. QUESTION:
    What types of oil can I use on wood furniture?
    I want to restore some of the lustre. What types of oil can I use? I don't want to have to go buy furniture oil if I can just use olive oil, vegetable oil, sesame oil, or baby oil, which I have in the house. Thanks! I am talking about dressers, chests of drawers, oak kitchen table, etc.

    • ANSWER:
      don't use a vegetable oil (including olive oil). Yuck, they can go rancid and build up.

      Likewise, linseed oil will not do well on top of another finish. It is not meant to build up. It will polymerize and stay soft and sticky forever.

      For six dollars, you can buy Guardsman Furniture Polish Concentrate that will make 5 pints of polish. Using once a month, it will last a loooong time.

      For the same six dollars, you can buy a good can of furniture wax. Using once every couple of years it will last a long time also.

  6. QUESTION:
    help with decorating a living room to coordinate with two other rooms in an open floor plan house?
    my house has an open floor plan. the walls are a shade lighter than mustard yellow. my formal dining room is right next to the living room and it has traditional oak furniture and it has a buffet with a charcoal gray marble top. my hearth room is also next to my living room becuase it is right in front of my kitchen, which has stainless steel appliances and uba tuba (ooba tooba?) green granite counter tops along with cherry cabinets. The hearth room has contemporary black leather furniture and black glass tables.
    how can i coordinate my living room to look good with both my traditional-style formal dining room and my contemporary hearth room.
    please let me know if you need any more information.
    any suggestions for stores are welcome. links with pieces that you like from stores like Bombay and Pier One would also be very helpful.
    thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      The "experts" say pick a color scheme and carry it throughout--sounds like you have a relatively "blank palate" with black leather furniture. If it were me, I'd choose say three colors..and make one the dominant color in each room..and accent with the other two in the rooms.
      Martha Stewart would probably say mix textures and fabrics, as wel. Maybe a print (chintz) would be good in the dining room. With black leather, you could do something more shiny (not satin, but something like it?) for pillows. Add a throw, or even a couple of nice artsy sort of pieces. Play off the colors of the chintz in the dining room.
      You've got mustard yellow walls, green and gray countertops. Depending on your yellow (is it a blue-ish or yellowish yellow?) you could add some shades of green, maybe a rust or blue tones. I'd find a color wheel (like paint stores have, or decorating books) and look at what's next to the wall colors on either side. Those are your complementary colors.
      I've also seen some wood items (frames, boxes, shelving units) that are black with a wood reveal..that might be a nice tie-in to bring some of the wood from one room into the black leather/glass room. (Hmmm...I feel like finding a paintbrush myself!)

  7. QUESTION:
    How much would you pay for this furniture?
    1) a well used dining set (table, 6 chairs, dining buffet and hutch). multiple owners. structurally sound, but the dining buffet/hutch has water damage on the finish.

    2) a well used kitchen table and 6 chairs. multiple owners. structurally sound, but one of the chairs spindles was chewed through by a dog. table is solid oak and gorgeous.
    ya, i was think about 0 - 0 per set. i'll post pics sometime this weekend.

    • ANSWER:
      Having just sold a lot of furniture on Craigslist over the past year from my mom's estate, I would say that unless the dining room set is a top brand name like Henredon or Drexel, don't expect to get more than 0 for it and be happy if someone offers you 0 and offers to pay cash and haul it away.

      For the kitchen set, advertise it for 0 but expect offers of 0.

      I suggest you look at the listings in your area's Craigslist for what your "competition" is. You can tell by looking at the listings which ones have been on there for a long time (just search on "Dining sets" and you'll see all the listings for two months). That will indicate which prices are too high for your market. Post the full 4 photos that are allowed on each Craigslist ad (include a closeup of any damage) and put your phone number in the ad. (You'll get e-mails from scammers offering to pay with a bank check and arrange shipping -- just ignore them.) State "cash sale and local pickup only."

      What used furniture is "worth" is only what other people are willing to pay for it. Just to let you know, my mom's dining set was 50 year old solid walnut Drexel from a line by a famous designer. If I had wanted the headache of auctioning it on Ebay and shipping out of state I know it was worth about 00 since it is considered collectible Danish Modern and the table was very rare. But I needed to get rid of it quickly and with as little hassle as possible so I put it on Craigslist. I could not sell it until I reduced it to 0 (and a guy drove 600 miles from Chicago to come and pick it up).

      Typically you will get about 1/2 the value if you are willing to wait. If you want to sell quick, price it at 1/3 the value.

oak furniture kitchen table